Posts

Road Salt Damage… Not So Savory for Our Cars

, , , , ,

It may already be March, but that doesn’t mean Mother Nature is done sending snow through Des Moines anytime soon. We’ve had some mega-snow storms this winter, and that’s had the Iowa Department of Transportation and local municipality road crews laying down deicer and road salt to keep the highways and by-ways clear.

road salt damageHow much? An estimated 200,000 tons of road salt is used by the Iowa Department of Transportation every winter and laid down through Des Moines and across the state to try and keep the roads clear. It’s a strategy that’s been used for decades to help prevent snow and ice from freezing to the road. It works, but it’s not all that savory for your car.

Road salt damage = corrosive. And the place it most likely accumulates after driving in winter weather is underneath your car. Unless you have the underside of your car treated with a oil-spray solution before the first snow fall, or have the underside of your car washed regularly throughout the winter, there’s a good chance salt is eating away at your car.

Road Salt left to corrode the underside of your car can damage the muffler and exhaust system. Left unchecked, salt can even make its way through coil springs and the steel frame of your car. It’s even been known to penetrate a car’s subframe.

If you didn’t do any pre-winter maintenance on your car to prevent corrosion from salt, it’s never too late to get an inspection, remove any remaining salt, and make repairs if necessary. In some cases, a late-season cleaning of your car’s underside may be enough to prevent extensive corrosion damage.

If corrosion is excessive, rust repair and replacement parts may be necessary. Either way, the sooner you get any salt off your vehicle that’s accumulated from driving in winter weather, the better.

With a simple Oil Change, you also get a free wash and cleaning of your car’s exterior and light interior. This time of year, that alone is worth the price of an oil change.

Schedule your service now and get that salt and road grime off, and help save the beauty that is your car!

Water Pump is Critical to Protecting Your Engine

, , ,

When former race car driver Dick Trickle blew a water pump in a short-track race in Wisconsin, he wasn’t about to throw in the towel and concede to losing. Instead, he jumped out of his car, grabbed the announcer’s microphone and yelled into the crowd, “Does anybody have a Ford?”

race car driver Dick Trickle blew a water pumpAmong the fans there to see the race, a guy emerged from the crowd and proceeded to drive his Ford down to the track. While other races still circled the track, Trickle went to work. He dismantled his car to remove the water pump. Then he pulled the water pump off the Ford and put it in his race car. Seconds later, he was back in the race, caught up with the other drivers, took the lead and won.

Water Pump Helps Keep Engine Cool
Driving around the Des Moines-area can sometimes feel like you’re in a NASCAR race. And even the day-to-day stuff like commuting to work and going to the grocery store can take a toll on your car. Drive your car long enough, and eventually your water pump might could begin to fail. If it does, you’ve should stop your car immediately, or risk overheating the engine and doing permanent damage that’s expensive to repair.

Warning Signs of a Bad Water Pump
The water pump in your car helps keep your engine cool. That’s important when you’re on a road trip, cruising down the Interstate, or just driving around town. If your water pump is going bad, taking action if you see any of these early warning signs can save you from a car breakdown and more expensive repairs. Your water pump may be going bad if:

  • You notice water or coolant leaking from the engine when you park your car.
  • The belt that helps drive the water pump is cracked or loose.
  • You noticed a low-pitched grinding noise when your engine is running.
  • Water leaks or even a small spray is coming from the water pump gasket.
  • The engine temperature warning light comes on in your car.
  • Your car’s air conditioning doesn’t seem to cool things off.

You can’t always predict when a water pump will go bad. Trickle certainly didn’t expect that to happen in the middle of a race. But paying attention to the warning signs, and bringing your car in for an inspection if you do, will keep you in the race.

Click here to schedule an appointment and make sure your water pump is “race ready.”